Upcoming events in New Zealand and overseas.

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  • All day
    2019-08-03-2019-09-07

    The essentials of oral history research, Auckland — Day one: Introduction to oral history
    A two-day practical introduction to oral history methodology.

    Date: Saturday, 3 August, 2019
    Time: 8:45am to 4:30pm
    Cost: For both days: $300 waged/ $220 Community Services Card holders
    Location: New Zealand Maritime Museum, Corner of Quay and, Hobson St, Viaduct Harbour
    Contact Details: ATLOutreach@dia.govt.nz
    Course dates
    This is the first day of a popular two-day workshop, The essentials of oral history research.

    The course is being held in Auckland on Saturday, 3 August and Saturday, 7 September.

    The essentials of oral history research, Auckland — Day two: Recording seriously

    What you’ll learn
    The day will include plenty of hands-on practice. On day one of this oral history course you’ll learn how to:

    plan an oral history project
    choose the best equipment
    achieve clear audio recordings
    select informants
    follow ethical procedures develop questioning techniques
    process oral history, and make the material available for use.
    National Oral History Association of New Zealand (NOHANZ)’s Code of Ethical and Technical Practice
    Our training is based on the principles enshrined in the National Oral History Association of New Zealand (NOHANZ)’s Code of Ethical and Technical Practice, and international archival standards.

    Equipment provided
    All equipment is provided and all participants receive comprehensive guides and resources and a certificate of attendance.

    You need to attend both days of the course
    Attendance on both days is required and places are limited.

    About the speakers
    Megan Hutching is an Auckland-based freelance oral historian, and Lynette Shum is Oral History Advisor for the Alexander Turnbull Library, National Library of New Zealand.

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  • 10:00 -13:00
    2019-08-07

    The Baylor University Institute for Oral History invites you to join its online, live audio workshop, “Getting Started with Oral History.” The interactive workshop will provide six hours of instruction on two consecutive Wednesdays in August—August 7 and 14, from 10:00 a.m. CDT to 1:00 p.m. CDT. You may take part in the workshop from the convenience of your home or office computer via Cisco WebEx. This introductory workshop, designed to help participants plan and begin an oral history project, will be taught by Institute for Oral History faculty and staff members Adrienne Cain, Michelle Holland, Steven Sielaff, and Stephen Sloan. Participants will create a project design and conduct an oral history interview as part of the course. The cost is $100, which includes the two sessions, online access to all reading materials, and ongoing consultation for your oral history project. CPE credits are available for Texas K-12 teachers. There is room for only a few more participants, so register soon!
    Learn more about the workshop topics, faculty, computer system requirements, and registration at baylor.edu/oralhistory.
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  • All day
    2019-08-10-2019-09-14

    The essentials of oral history research, Wellington — Day one: Introduction to oral history
    A practical introduction to oral history methodology.

    Date: Saturday, 10 August, 2019
    Time: 8:45am to 4:30pm
    Cost: For both days: $300 waged/ $220 Community Services Card holders
    Location: National Library, Tiakiwai Conference Centre (lower ground floor), Corner Molesworth and Aitken Streets, Wellington. Entrance from ground floor main enterance.
    Contact Details: ATLOutreach@dia.govt.nz
    Course dates
    This is the first day of a popular two-day workshop, The essentials of oral history research.

    The course is being held in Wellington on Saturday, 10 August and Saturday, 14 September.

    The essentials of oral history research, Wellington — Day two: Recording seriously

    What you’ll learn
    The day will include plenty of hands-on practice. On day one of this oral history course you’ll learn how to:

    plan an oral history project
    choose the best equipment
    achieve clear audio recordings
    select informants
    follow ethical procedures develop questioning techniques
    process oral history, and make the material available for use.
    National Oral History Association of New Zealand (NOHANZ)’s Code of Ethical and Technical Practice
    Our training is based on the principles enshrined in the National Oral History Association of New Zealand (NOHANZ)’s Code of Ethical and Technical Practice, and international archival standards.

    Equipment provided
    All equipment is provided and all participants receive comprehensive guides and resources and a certificate of attendance.

    You need to attend both days of the course
    Attendance on both days is required and places are limited.

    About the speakers
    Shona McMahon is a Wellington-based freelance oral historian, and Lynette Shum is Oral History Advisor for the Alexander Turnbull Library, National Library of New Zealand.

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  • All day
    2019-08-24-2019-09-28

    The essentials of oral history research, Dunedin — Day one: Introduction to oral history
    A two-day practical introduction to oral history methodology.

    Date: Saturday, 24 August, 2019
    Time: 8:45am to 4:30pm
    Cost: For both days: $300 waged/ $220 Community Services Card holders
    Location: Hocken Library, Otago University, 90 Anzac Avenue, North Dunedin
    Contact Details: ATLOutreach@dia.govt.nz
    Course dates
    This is the first day of a popular two-day workshop, The essentials of oral history research.

    The course is being held in Dunedin on Saturday, 24 August and Saturday, 28 September.

    The essentials of oral history research, Dunedin — Day two: Recording seriously

    What you’ll learn
    The day will include plenty of hands-on practice. On day one of this oral history course you’ll learn how to:

    plan an oral history project
    choose the best equipment
    achieve clear audio recordings
    select informants
    follow ethical procedures develop questioning techniques
    process oral history, and make the material available for use.
    National Oral History Association of New Zealand (NOHANZ)’s Code of Ethical and Technical Practice
    Our training is based on the principles enshrined in the National Oral History Association of New Zealand (NOHANZ)’s Code of Ethical and Technical Practice, and international archival standards.

    Equipment provided
    All equipment is provided and all participants receive comprehensive guides and resources and a certificate of attendance.

    You need to attend both days of the course
    Attendance on both days is required and places are limited.

    About the speakers
    Helen Frizzell is a Dunedin-based freelance oral historian, and Lynette Shum is Oral History Advisor for the Alexander Turnbull Library, National Library of New Zealand.

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  • 09:00 -16:30
    2019-08-29

    Read the flyer

    The Winter School in Advanced Oral History is designed for members of the public and postgraduate students who are thinking about or starting a research project that includes oral history interviews. The course will benefit those with previous oral history or qualitative interview experience who wish to extend and deepen their knowledge of the field, and those interested in recording, understanding and contextualising family memories.

    You will examine different approaches to oral history including those based upon Mātauranga Māori/Kaupapa Māori and learn the steps required to construct a methodologically robust, ethical oral history research proposal. As you progress, you will discuss how to frame the research goals, find the interview cohort, choose an interview format, and contextualise your material.

    By the end of the course you will have learned about different research methods and formulated a draft oral history research proposal. There will also be the opportunity to discuss possible forms of publication.

    A limited number of Māori, Pasifika and financial hardship scholarships are available – see the application form for details on how to apply.

    Scholarship applications close Monday 15 July
    Notification of decision Monday 29 July

    Course Objectives:

    • Formulate an oral history research proposal

    • Learn about different research methods and modes of analysis

    • Be introduced to Mātauranga Māori/Kaupapa Māori approaches to oral history

    • Consider the relationship between memory and history

    Recommended Reading List:

    • Robert Perks and Alistair Thomson, eds, The Oral History Reader, 2nd ed (Routledge, 2006).

    • Anna Green and Megan Hutching, eds, Remembering: Writing Oral History (Auckland University Press, 2004).

    Course Outline:

    DAY ONE

    1. Introduction: What do we know about memory/remembering?

    2. What is oral history? Approaches and debates

    3. Mātauranga Māori/Kaupapa Māori approaches to oral history

    4. Framing the purpose and goals of your oral history project

    5. Who do I want to interview and how do I find them?

    6. Workshop exercise: drafting part one of proposal

    DAY TWO

    7. The recorded interview and interview questions

    8. Ethics: agreement and consent

    9. Analysis: social and cultural historical context

    10. Analysis: narrative form

    11. The relationship between memory and history

    12. Workshop exercise: finalizing your oral history project proposal

    Facilitators:

    The course will be collaboratively taught by Associate Professor Anna Green, Stout Research Centre; Dr Arini Loader History programme, Victoria University of Wellington; and public historian Megan Hutching.

    A nna Green

    Associate Professor Anna Green is a member of the Stout Research Centre in New Zealand Studies at Victoria University of Wellington. Oral history and the relationship between memory and history have been at the centre of her research and publications, with a focus upon working lives and communities, environmental disaster, and the family. Her current Marsden researc​_h project on Pākehā intergenerational family memory is entitled ‘The Missing Link’.

    Arini Loader

    Dr Arini Loader is a lecturer in the School of History, Philosophy, Political Science and International Relations at Victoria University of Wellington. She specialises in the history of Aotearoa New Zealand. Her current research projects include a collaborative project with Dr Michael Ross on a collection of waiata (song) texts written by Māori taken prisoner following the battle of Rangiriri in the New Zealand Wars.

    Megan Hutching

    Megan Hutching is a freelance historian and oral historian with over 25 years’ experience in these fields. Her recent oral history work includes commissioned oral history projects for the New Zealand Association of Women Judges, and Engineering NZ, as well as a number of life history interviews for families. Personal oral history projects include the Auckland harbour bridge, and the domestic lives of New Zealand women in the mid-twentieth century.

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