Upcoming events in New Zealand and overseas.

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  • 01
    01.May.Wednesday

    16:10 -17:30
    2019-05-01

    1 May 2019 from 4.10 pm – 5.30 pm
    Stout Research Centre Seminar Room, 12 Waiteata Rd, Kelburn

    Family Seminar Series

    Presenter: Anna Green

    When asked about their family past, where do Pākehā families choose to begin? Origin stories are widely perceived to exert considerable power and emotional traction in the narrative construction of both collective and personal identities in the present. In this presentation I want to explore two kinds of ‘origin stories’ evident in my current Marsden-funded research into Pākehā intergenerational family memory. The first story might be characterized as ‘from the outside in’, and the second as ‘from the inside out’. I will draw upon the oral history interviews conducted over the past three years with sixty multigenerational families, throughout the country, whose European forebears arrived in New Zealand between the 1830s and the onset of the First World War in 1914. How did our participants begin their family stories, and which origin story might be the most powerful in the creation of personal narrative identities?

    ***

    Anna Green is an Associate Professor in the Stout Research Centre for New Zealand Studies at Victoria University of Wellington. Her current research focuses upon family memory, and recent publications include ‘Who Do You Think You Are? The Family in Public History’ in What is Public History Globally (2019); and ‘Intergenerational Family Memory and Historical Consciousness’ in Contemplating Historical Consciousness (2019).
  • 06
    06.May.Monday

    All day
    2019-05-06-2019-05-10

    IN THE MIND’S EYE: RECORDING ORAL HISTORY | MAY 6-10
    TUTOR: JUDITH FYFE | FEE: $450
    This workshop is essential for anyone considering using oral history in their work, community or personal projects. It will provide information on the essentials of oral history research, including methodology, project planning, best equipment, interview techniques, legal and ethical issues and processing oral history in order to make the material available for use. There’ll be plenty of hands-on practice!

    Great events make history but ultimately, it’s the individual’s perception of events which really matters. The collection of oral testimony based on individual memory enriches the store of historical evidence to reconstruct the past, whether that past is a collective public one or a private, familial one.

    All materials, including recorders, will be provided, but if you already have one you intend to use for your project, please bring it.

    JUDITH’S BIO
    Judith is a lawyer and oral historian. Currently she practises as a barrister specialising in investigation. She lectures in oral history in New Zealand and the United States and is contracted by the Alexander Turnbull Library to carry out contemporary oral history projects. Prior to founding the New Zealand Oral History Archive, she worked in broadcasting, television and film.

    Her publications include The Gamble – Campaign Diary of the Challengers (co-writer Hugo Manson); The Matriarchs and War Stories Our Mothers Never Told Us; Oral History: An Introduction to Social Research in New Zealand (Editors: Carl Davidson & Martin Tolich).

    Judith’s assistant Lynette Shum is the Oral History Advisor at the Alexander Turnbull Library, focusing on training, advice, and support. Her master’s thesis used oral history to look at the history of the Chinese community in Wellington.

  • 08
    08.May.Wednesday

    09:00 -12:00
    2019-05-08

    8 May 2019 from 9.00 am – 12.00 pm
    Stout Seminar Room

    Facilitators:
    Professor Alexander Freund (University of Winnipeg) and Associate Professor Anna Green (Stout Research Centre, Victoria University of Wellington).

    Professor Freund holds the chair in German-Canadian Studies and is Director of the Oral History Centre at the University of Winnipeg. He has published widely in oral history and migration history. Associate Professor Green’s publications in oral history encompass labour, community, and environmental history, and her research currently focuses upon family memory and historical consciousness. For more information please see: https://www.uwinnipeg.ca/history/faculty-staff/alexander-freund and https://www.victoria.ac.nz/stout-centre/about/staff/anna-green.

    Participants in this workshop will be asked to introduce themselves and suggest a question or topic, relating to their research, that they would like the workshop to address. Areas we might also focus upon include: creating space in an interview situation, different formats for interviewing, the role of the tape recorder as a “third participant”, and approaches to conversational narrative. We could also consider issues such as questions as impositions, and the interview as a cultural script.

    Venue: Stout Research Centre for NZ Studies, 12 Waiteata Road, Kelburn
    Date: 8 May 2019
    Time: 9.00am to 12.00 noon.
    Number is limited to 12 participants. No cost involved.
    RSVP to Deborah.levy@vuw.ac.nz

  • 08
    08.May.Wednesday

    09:00 -12:00
    2019-05-08

    8 May 2019 from 9.00 am – 12.00 pm
    Stout Seminar Room

    Facilitators:
    Professor Alexander Freund (University of Winnipeg) and Associate Professor Anna Green (Stout Research Centre, Victoria University of Wellington).

    Professor Freund holds the chair in German-Canadian Studies and is Director of the Oral History Centre at the University of Winnipeg. He has published widely in oral history and migration history. Associate Professor Green’s publications in oral history encompass labour, community, and environmental history, and her research currently focuses upon family memory and historical consciousness. For more information please see: https://www.uwinnipeg.ca/history/faculty-staff/alexander-freund and https://www.victoria.ac.nz/stout-centre/about/staff/anna-green.

    Participants in this workshop will be asked to introduce themselves and suggest a question or topic, relating to their research, that they would like the workshop to address. Areas we might also focus upon include: creating space in an interview situation, different formats for interviewing, the role of the tape recorder as a “third participant”, and approaches to conversational narrative. We could also consider issues such as questions as impositions, and the interview as a cultural script.
    Venue: Stout Research Centre for NZ Studies, 12 Waiteata Road, Kelburn
    Date: 8 May 2019
    Time: 9.00am to 12.00 noon.
    Number is limited to 12 participants. No cost involved.
    RSVP to Deborah.levy@vuw.ac.nz
  • 08
    08.May.Wednesday

    16:10 -17:30
    2019-05-08

    8 May 2019 from 4.10 pm – 5.30 pm
    Stout Research Centre, 12 Waiteata Rd, Kelburn

    Presenter: Professor Alexander Freund
    How do families “reminisce” about the experience of war and flight? In this presentation, I look at interviews with members of three families who experienced state violence and displacement in the wake of the Second World War. Two of the three refugees (men born in Central Europe between 1928 and 1936) were interviewed in Winnipeg, Canada, in 1978 and 1989, respectively. In order to help us understand how memories and stories change over long personal, familial, and historical time periods, we re-interviewed the two men in 2012/13. We then interviewed some of their children and grandchildren to help us understand how stories of war and flight had been transferred across – and negotiated among – generations. These artificially “re-constructed,” partial family memories were characterised by sparse interaction, silences, unspoken assumptions, and imagined memories. Later generations added new details and re-interpreted their elders’ stories to better fit their own lives. Such findings raise more questions: What exactly is “family memory”? What kind of a “family memory” is this – or is it “family memory” at all? How can we use such memories for our study of history, the history of memory, and the historical role of memory in society?

    ***

    Alexander Freund is a Professor of History at the University of Winnipeg, where he holds the Chair in German-Canadian Studies and serves as the Director of the Oral History Centre. A native of Germany and immigrant to Canada, Freund has been focusing on the transatlantic, especially German-North American, history of the twentieth and early twenty-first centuries. Recent publications include: History, Memory, and Generations: German-Canadian Experiences in the Twentieth Century (forthcoming); The Canadian Oral History Reader (2015, edited with Kristina Llewellyn and Nolan Reilly); Oral History and Ethnic History (2014); “Under Storytelling’s Spell? Oral History in a Neo-liberal Age” (Oral History Review, 2015); “Transnationalising Home in Winnipeg: Refugees’ Stories of the Places Between the “Here-and-There”” (Canadian Ethnic Studies, 2015); and, ““Confessing Animals”: Toward a Longue Durée History of the Oral History Interview” (Oral History Review, 2014).