Upcoming events in New Zealand and overseas.

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  • 6-10 May: In the Mind’s Eye
    All day
    2019-05-06-2019-05-10

    IN THE MIND’S EYE: RECORDING ORAL HISTORY | MAY 6-10
    TUTOR: JUDITH FYFE | FEE: $450
    This workshop is essential for anyone considering using oral history in their work, community or personal projects. It will provide information on the essentials of oral history research, including methodology, project planning, best equipment, interview techniques, legal and ethical issues and processing oral history in order to make the material available for use. There’ll be plenty of hands-on practice!

    Great events make history but ultimately, it’s the individual’s perception of events which really matters. The collection of oral testimony based on individual memory enriches the store of historical evidence to reconstruct the past, whether that past is a collective public one or a private, familial one.

    All materials, including recorders, will be provided, but if you already have one you intend to use for your project, please bring it.

    JUDITH’S BIO
    Judith is a lawyer and oral historian. Currently she practises as a barrister specialising in investigation. She lectures in oral history in New Zealand and the United States and is contracted by the Alexander Turnbull Library to carry out contemporary oral history projects. Prior to founding the New Zealand Oral History Archive, she worked in broadcasting, television and film.

    Her publications include The Gamble – Campaign Diary of the Challengers (co-writer Hugo Manson); The Matriarchs and War Stories Our Mothers Never Told Us; Oral History: An Introduction to Social Research in New Zealand (Editors: Carl Davidson & Martin Tolich).

    Judith’s assistant Lynette Shum is the Oral History Advisor at the Alexander Turnbull Library, focusing on training, advice, and support. Her master’s thesis used oral history to look at the history of the Chinese community in Wellington.

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  • 8 May 2019 Research Interview Workshop
    09:00 -12:00
    2019-05-08

    8 May 2019 from 9.00 am – 12.00 pm
    Stout Seminar Room

    Facilitators:
    Professor Alexander Freund (University of Winnipeg) and Associate Professor Anna Green (Stout Research Centre, Victoria University of Wellington).

    Professor Freund holds the chair in German-Canadian Studies and is Director of the Oral History Centre at the University of Winnipeg. He has published widely in oral history and migration history. Associate Professor Green’s publications in oral history encompass labour, community, and environmental history, and her research currently focuses upon family memory and historical consciousness. For more information please see: https://www.uwinnipeg.ca/history/faculty-staff/alexander-freund and https://www.victoria.ac.nz/stout-centre/about/staff/anna-green.

    Participants in this workshop will be asked to introduce themselves and suggest a question or topic, relating to their research, that they would like the workshop to address. Areas we might also focus upon include: creating space in an interview situation, different formats for interviewing, the role of the tape recorder as a “third participant”, and approaches to conversational narrative. We could also consider issues such as questions as impositions, and the interview as a cultural script.

    Venue: Stout Research Centre for NZ Studies, 12 Waiteata Road, Kelburn
    Date: 8 May 2019
    Time: 9.00am to 12.00 noon.
    Number is limited to 12 participants. No cost involved.
    RSVP to Deborah.levy@vuw.ac.nz

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  • 11 May 2019 Recording our Place: Telling Stories with Sound
    10:00 -16:00
    2019-05-11

    Generator Makerspace
    40 Sears Lane Burlington, VT, 05401

    What does “place” sound like? In this hands-on workshop you’ll learn basic audio recording skills and head out into the field to collect interviews. We’ll also record ambient and natural noises and think about how how we experience place through sound. Then we’ll look at the editing process to explore how we can use audio to tell a story and deepen our understanding of place. This workshop is presented in partnership with the Generator Makerspace. Burlington’s South End will be our sonic laboratory but the skills you’ll learn can apply to whatever project you might be working on.

    This workshop is for anyone wanting to learn the ins-and-outs of audio production and storytelling with a focus on documenting culture, community and place. It will be accessible for people at all levels of technical knowledge from the complete beginner to the professional. A collaborative learning atmosphere will be encouraged. The VFC will provide audio equipment for those who need it; if you have your own gear you are encouraged to bring it. We will explore a full range of recording options including low-resource audio production tools such as cell phones or borrowed equipment from community media outlets. Anyone can produce audio! Feel free to come with a project in mind or simply attend with an exploratory spirit.

    The day will begin with a brief introduction to the Vermont Folklife Center’s work and our approach to cultural research and media production. Then we’ll explore the tools, technologies, and methods involved in collecting audio field recordings and interviews, taking a real “field trip” into the South End neighborhood to gather sound. By the end of the day you will have learned the basics of interviewing, audio recording and editing as well as ideas for how to share and distribute your audio. You will have a new set of skills and connections to bring to your personal or community projects. There will be space in the day to discuss your own projects (prospective or in progress) and the ways VFC staff and resources might offer support or guidance.

    Instructor: Mary Wesley, audio producer and host of the VFC’s podcast – “VT Untapped

    Recording Our Place: Telling Stories with Sound will be held at the Generator Makerspace in Burlington. Tuition is $95 ($55/students). You may also register by calling the Vermont Folklife Center at (802) 388-4964.

    If you cancel up to seven days before the event, we will issue a refund minus a $10 fee.

    This workshop is a part of the Vermont Folklife Center’s Cultural Sustainability Institute series. Cultural Sustainability provides a framework for examining human experience in the present with an awareness of the past and a view toward the future.

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  • 18 May 2019 Recording Audio for Oral History & Ethnography
    10:00 -15:00
    2019-05-18

    Vermont Folklife Center
    88 Main Street Middlebury, VT 05753

     

    Audio is a powerful medium for capturing human experience and human expression. In the context of cultural sustainability efforts, audio is a useful tool for documenting local knowledge, exploring values and perceptions, and building resources for understanding and supporting cultural practices.

    Intended for students, community members, staff members of non-profit cultural, community and social-service agencies, as well as professional researchers interested in learning more about audio recording options, this workshop will provide a basic introduction to the use of contemporary digital audio recording equipment in the context of ethnographic and oral history interviews.

    Attendees will receive a thorough introduction to the fundamentals of digital audio, types of common field-recording microphones, and the use of digital audio recorders. The workshop includes hands-on exercises with equipment in a simulated interview setting. We will use the TASCAM DR-40 and mobile devices for these exercises, but the fundamental skills demonstrated will be applicable to most currently available digital audio recorders. In addition to the use of this equipment, we will also cover the selection and purchase of audio recording equipment and Android and iOS recording apps.

    Instructor: Andy Kolovos, VFC Director of Archives and Research

    Recording Audio for Oral History will be held at The Vermont Folklife Center in downtown Middlebury. Attendance is limited to 14 participants. Tuition is $95 ($55/students). You may also register by calling the Vermont Folklife Center at (802) 388-4964.

    If you cancel up to seven days before the event, we will issue a refund minus a $10 fee.

    This workshop is a part of the Vermont Folklife Center’s Cultural Sustainability Institute series. Cultural Sustainability provides a framework for examining human experience in the present with an awareness of the past and a view toward the future.

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  • 26 May 2019 Storytelling for Community-Based Projects
    10:00 -16:00
    2019-05-25

    Saturday, May 25, 2019
    10:00 AM 4:00 PM
    Generator Makerspace
    40 Sears Lane Burlington, VT, 05401

     

    If you are interested in community-based research for advocacy or creative projects, Storytelling for Community-Based Projects will introduce techniques in ethnography, oral history and storytelling, in the service of socially-engaged projects. Join The Vermont Folklife Center on Saturday, May 25, 2019 from 10 am to 4 pm at The Generator Makerspace, 40 Sears Ln, Burlington, VT 05401.

    This workshop is intended for anyone interested in developing collaborative projects centered in community-based research, documentary or storytelling mediums, including students, community members, socially-engaged artists and staff of organizations doing cultural, community, and social-service work. Attendees will be invited to take a critical and analytical look at the history of ethnography and documentary work, as well as explore hands-on techniques in observation, fieldwork, interviewing, audio/visual documenting, project conception, and outreach for project participants.

    Storytelling for Community-Based Projects combines discussion of the theories and methods that inform community-based research with practical, hands-on training in interviewing and storytelling techniques — while also encouraging attendees to consider the challenges, possibilities, and ethics of representation. Additionally, a showcase of projects with both youth and adult populations will provide a foundation on which to build these ideas.

    Led by Teaching Artist and Vermont Folklife Center Educator Trish Denton, this workshop will help participants develop a plan for a community-based research project and will offer a forum for brainstorming creative applications inspired by community-based research.


    Storytelling for Community-Based Projects is offered in partnership with The Generator Makerspace. Tuition is $95 ($55/students). You may also register by calling the Vermont Folklife Center at (802) 388-4964.

    If you cancel up to seven days before the event, we will issue a refund minus a $10 fee.

    This workshop is a part of the Vermont Folklife Center’s Cultural Sustainability Institute series. Cultural Sustainability provides a framework for examining human experience in the present with an awareness of the past and a view toward the future.

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