Oral Histories of Work & Leisure: Galway 23rd & 24th June 2017

Conference: Oral Histories of Work & Leisure — Galway City, 23rd & 24th June 2017  more

The programme for the 2017 Conference of the Oral History Network of Ireland ‘Oral Histories of Work and Leisure’ is now available to download from the conference page on our website: http://www.oralhistorynetworkireland.ie/ohni-conferences/2017-conference/

The conference takes places in The Connacht Hotel, Galway, on 23rd and 24th June 2017.

There will be speakers from across the island of Ireland as well as from Great Britain and the United States for a weekend of papers, moments, and workshops. Our keynote lecture will be provided by Don Ritchie — ‘Oral Historians at Work (and Play).’

Registration closes on Friday 16th June.

Conference registration and details are all available on: http://www.oralhistorynetworkireland.ie/ohni-conferences/2017-conference/

If you wish to get in touch with us please email us at: info@oralhistorynetworkireland.ie

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