Digital Tools for Oral History – Workshop

Digital Tools for Oral History Workshop
by Stephen Sloan

We are excited to announce our 2018 offering in our advanced online oral history workshop series, Sharpen Your Skills: Advanced E-Workshops. “Digital Tools for Oral History” will focus on a selection of innovative options and applications available to the twenty-first century oral historian. BUIOH Director Stephen Sloan and Senior Editor/Collection Manager Steven Sielaff will discuss software and web platforms (most of which are free/open source!) that will enable you to accomplish and enhance your project goals of preservation, access, curation, and dissemination. This workshop is be a single three-hour session on May 23 from 10:00am to 1:00pm CDT and costs $75.

To register for this workshop, follow this link: https://www.baylor.edu/oralhistory/index.php?id=936083

· To read more or reply: https://networks.h-net.org/user/login?destination=node/1709515

Related upcoming events

  • 2018-10-10 - 2018-10-13 All day

    Annual Meeting

    2018 OHA Annual Meeting
    October 10-13, 2018
    Concordia University
    Montreal, Quebec, Canada

    Make plans to attend the 2018 OHA Annual Meeting at Concordia University in Montreal. The annual meeting attracts a broad range of people and features the best work in the field. The meeting enables students and both emerging and established scholars to network and learn valuable skills. The theme for 2018 is Oral History in Our Challenging Times.

    The Call is available at 2018 Call for Papers. The submission site is open at OHA 2018. The proposal deadline is January 31, 2018.

    Please see Conference Directions for more information about where the conference is located and the best ways to get there. We also have some tips for driving around Quebec and Montreal.

    Here are some Travel Trips on how to navigate the traveling process to Canada.

    Finally, here are some good places to eat in the area, as well as some fun attractions to check out while in Montreal.

    From #believesurvivors to #metoo, narratives around harassment, abuse, and sexual violence have become increasingly prominent in the media over the last few years. This panel draws on feminist oral history practice to explore critical questions relating to oral narratives of harassment and abuse. Oral history, with its ability to capture personal experiences and intimate narratives, is well-suited to document experiences of sexual violence, harassment, and abuse. The sharing of traumatic memories can also raise a range of ethical issues for narrators and interviewers. This panel explores how interviews exploring experiences of harassment and abuse, particularly within institutions and organizations, can shed new light on contemporary efforts to achieve justice for survivors.

    This is a proposed panel for OHA 2018. Please send abstracts for papers to kja45@sfu.ca by January 17th. Abstracts must be 300 words or less and accompanied by a 400-word (or less) CV. Applicants will be notified if their paper will be part of the proposed panel by January 21st.

    Potential paper topics include:

    • Sexual violence within past or present social justice movements

    • Sexual abuse or harassment in the workplace

    • Intersections between sexual violence and other forms of oppression (such as racism, classism, transphobia, ableism, and homophobia)

    • Legal and ethical issues relating to interviews about specific acts of abuse or harassment.

    • Trauma-informed approaches to interviewing.

    • Shared authority as it relates to interviews with survivors or perpetrators of violence.

    • Other ethical issues pertaining to interviewing accused perpetrators of violence and abuse.

    • Oral histories of anti-violence activist movements.

    This list is not exhaustive, and we welcome all submissions that explore oral histories of gendered abuse, harassment, and violence.

  • 2019-01-03 - 2019-01-06 All day

    Chicago
    Panel "Loyalty and Competing Narratives in Oral History

    The panel is tentatively titled "Loyalty and Competing Narratives in Oral History," and deals with the challenge of if and how, and to what extent, the historian should or must privilege their own interpretation over the meanings that interlocutors assign to their own stories.

    This panel addresses one of the most prominent challenges facing historians working with testimony: how to balance the scholar’s interpretation against, or alongside, the meanings and significance with which subjects invest their own life stories. Confronting the tension between loyalties (what the historian feels towards the subject and what she feels towards her own interpretation) is more than a simple theoretical exercise; it can profoundly shape the finished product and has ramifications for the morality and ethics of historical practice when that practice includes living interlocutors. Moreover, does (or should) the loyalty (or conflicted loyalties) that oral historians feel towards their subjects differ from the fidelity (or skepticism) which historians of all stripes should approach their source material? This panel explores these questions and seeks to contribute new theoretical and methodological insight to the evolving field of oral history.

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