8 February 2019 Sonic South 2019: Call for Submissions

2019-02-08 All day

The Southern Oral History Program (SOHP), housed at the Center for the Study of the American South at the University of North Carolina Chapel Hill, invites artists, composers, audio/radio producers, writers, and community members to use our interviews to create new and thought-provoking short-form audio documentaries, sound art, sonic experiments, and aural landscapes.

Producers are encouraged to think creatively about format, structure, and style. Since 1973, the SOHP has recorded interviews with southerners from mill workers to civil rights leaders to future presidents, which are available digitally through the Southern Historical Collection at Wilson Library.

For our 2019 Sonic South audio competition, In Sickness & In Health, we’re highlighting SOHP’s major research project, Stories to Save Lives. Producers will choose from interviews with Southerners about health, illness, and medical care in their own lives, in their families and in their communities. Your creativity can help us illuminate the power of these stories.

The top five finalists will have their work shared at a live listening room in April 2019 at the CURRENT Theater in Chapel Hill, NC. Two prizes will be awarded: the Sonic South prize, and the Audience Choice award.

There are three rules for this competition.

Final work must:

Be no longer than three minutes in length
Incorporate themes of health, illness, or medical care in the American South
Use at least two different voices from this curated collection of 15 SOHP interviews.
Entries are due on Friday, February 8, 2019 by midnight EST.

For more information about the competition, the rules, and how to submit, please visit the Sonic South website.

Related upcoming events

  • 2019-08-07 10:00 - 2019-08-07 13:00
    The Baylor University Institute for Oral History invites you to join its online, live audio workshop, "Getting Started with Oral History." The interactive workshop will provide six hours of instruction on two consecutive Wednesdays in August—August 7 and 14, from 10:00 a.m. CDT to 1:00 p.m. CDT. You may take part in the workshop from the convenience of your home or office computer via Cisco WebEx. This introductory workshop, designed to help participants plan and begin an oral history project, will be taught by Institute for Oral History faculty and staff members Adrienne Cain, Michelle Holland, Steven Sielaff, and Stephen Sloan. Participants will create a project design and conduct an oral history interview as part of the course. The cost is $100, which includes the two sessions, online access to all reading materials, and ongoing consultation for your oral history project. CPE credits are available for Texas K-12 teachers. There is room for only a few more participants, so register soon!
    Learn more about the workshop topics, faculty, computer system requirements, and registration at baylor.edu/oralhistory.
  • 2019-09-16 - 2019-09-18 All day

    University of Stirling,Scotland 16-18 September 2019.

    Confirmed Keynotes:

    Professor Marianne Hirsch (Columbia University)

    Professor Lyndsey Stonebridge (University of Birmingham)

    The last century has seen millions of people displaced around the world as the result of war, persecution, or the end of empire. The current ‘migrant’ or ‘border crisis’ in the Mediterranean triggered by the war in Syria, uneven development in the Global South, and climate change is the most recent example of a succession of instances of forced mass migration. Within this long history of forced migration across continents and within Europe, we can also include the German Vertriebene, the French pieds-noirs, the Portuguese retornados, and forced migrants from the former Yugoslavia. These population movements posed acute political and social challenges to the receiving states, since they often embodied liminal positions being both citizens of receiving nation states and yet members of culturally distinct groups. These challenges often result in trauma for the individuals and families who experience them. In the longer term, migrants and receiving societies face the challenges of cultural integration, in which ethnicity, colonial ties and the associated legal status may, paradoxically, both facilitate acceptance and create barriers to it. The large number of forced migrants involved has implications for nationhood and identity on a supranational scale, leading to the production of new forms of cultural memory and political formulations in the present.

    This conference seeks to bring together and create a dialogue among scholars working on diverse geographical and historical instances of forced migration from a range of disciplinary perspectives in order to illuminate the processes of movement, integration and commemoration which characterise them. The primary focus of the conference will be forced migrations that have highlighted and/or called into question the internal and external borders of Europe, although comparative case studies from beyond Europe are welcome. Above all, it seeks to assess the ‘connectedness’ of disparate cases of forced migrations and to consider the influence and impact of specific events on subsequent migrations and those groups involved in them. It builds on the historical and ethnographical work of scholars such as Andrea L. Smith (Europe’s Invisible Migrants, 2003) and Manuel Borutta and Jan Jansen (Vertriebene and Pieds-Noirs in Postwar Germany and France, 2016), and seeks to broaden their comparative analyses to consider other forced migrant groups, and to extend the scholarship into new disciplinary areas. The conference is interested in how narratives by and about forced migrants use imaginative means to make sense of and represent their experiences, and to construct post-migration identities through genres such as literature, film, music, photography, and documentary.

    The conference committee welcome proposals across disciplines of migration studies, cultural studies, history, politics, literature, visual culture, memory studies, and other relevant scholarly fields. The scope of the conference includes but is not limited to:

    Attitudes towards and reception of migrant groups
    The legalities of forced migration
    Impacts on nationhood and European identity
    Borderscapes and biopolitics
    State management of perceived ‘migrant crises’
    Forced migrants as political constituents and lobbying groups
    Gendered experiences of forced migration
    Queering migration
    Exile and trauma
    Nostalgia and constructions of ‘home’
    Cultural memory: inter-generational transmission, multidirectionality, and ‘connective’ narratives
    Public approaches to fostering integration
    (Re-)constructing community and diaspora
    Attempts at return
    Please send proposals of 300 words and short bios for papers lasting 20 minutes to Dr Beatrice Ivey at beatrice.ivey@stir.ac.uk by 28 February 2019. Proposals for three or four paper panels are also welcomed, as are proposals from postgraduate students and early-career researchers. The language of the conference is English.

    The conference is funded by the AHRC, as part of the Leadership Fellows project, ‘Narratives and representations of the French settlers of Algeria’.

  • 2019-10-10 - 2019-10-13 All day

    In our 40th anniversary year, Oral History Queensland and Oral History Australia, in partnership with State Library Queensland and Queensland Memory, welcome proposals for our 2019 biennial conference in sun-soaked southern Queensland. Oral historians, in a variety of guises and combining age-old listening skills with dazzling new technologies, record intimate stories and create challenging histories. Our conference welcomes participants who use oral history in their work across the many fields and disciplines that contribute to community, professional and academic histories. We welcome presenters from across Australia, across the Tasman and around the world. We invite proposals for individual presentations, workshops, performances and thematic panels.

    The main conference at State Library Queensland will be on Friday 11th and Saturday 12th October 2019. Oral history training workshops will be held at a Brisbane venue on Thursday 10th October. Following the conference, on Sunday 13th October a selection of history walks and tours will introduce participants to the region’s rich and diverse communities of memory.

    In keeping with 2019 as the Year of Indigenous Languages, a Keynote plenary panel will focus on Oral History, Oral Tradition and Indigenous History (with invited speakers from Australia, New Zealand and Canada).

    Further details at https://www.oralhistoryaustralia.org.au/2019-conference.html

    CLOSING DATE FOR PROPOSALS: 1 MARCH 2019

    Alistair Thomson

  • 2019-10-16 - 2019-10-20 All day

    Pathways in the Field
    Considerations for those working in, on and around oral history
    October 16-20 2019
    Sheraton Saltr Lake City Hotel
    Salt Lake City, Utah
    Register at https://www.oralhistory.org/oha-conference-registration-for-soha-members/

  • 2020-06-22 07:56 - 2020-06-26 07:56
    The conference website will be launched in July 2019. Please look out for it!

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