6-10 May: In the Mind’s Eye

IN THE MIND’S EYE: RECORDING ORAL HISTORY | MAY 6-10
TUTOR: JUDITH FYFE | FEE: $450
This workshop is essential for anyone considering using oral history in their work, community or personal projects. It will provide information on the essentials of oral history research, including methodology, project planning, best equipment, interview techniques, legal and ethical issues and processing oral history in order to make the material available for use. There’ll be plenty of hands-on practice!

Great events make history but ultimately, it’s the individual’s perception of events which really matters. The collection of oral testimony based on individual memory enriches the store of historical evidence to reconstruct the past, whether that past is a collective public one or a private, familial one.

All materials, including recorders, will be provided, but if you already have one you intend to use for your project, please bring it.

JUDITH’S BIO
Judith is a lawyer and oral historian. Currently she practises as a barrister specialising in investigation. She lectures in oral history in New Zealand and the United States and is contracted by the Alexander Turnbull Library to carry out contemporary oral history projects. Prior to founding the New Zealand Oral History Archive, she worked in broadcasting, television and film.

Her publications include The Gamble – Campaign Diary of the Challengers (co-writer Hugo Manson); The Matriarchs and War Stories Our Mothers Never Told Us; Oral History: An Introduction to Social Research in New Zealand (Editors: Carl Davidson & Martin Tolich).

Judith’s assistant Lynette Shum is the Oral History Advisor at the Alexander Turnbull Library, focusing on training, advice, and support. Her master’s thesis used oral history to look at the history of the Chinese community in Wellington.

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  • 2020-07-03 - 2020-07-04 All day

     

    CALL FOR PAPERS: OHS Annual Conference 2020 -- Oral History and the Media, 3-4 July 2020, Bournemouth Universityby Fiona Cosson

    OHS Annual Conference 2020Oral History and the Media

    Friday 3rd and Saturday 4th July 2020Bournemouth University Oral history and the media have an important but complex relationship. The media has long been a significant producer of, and outlet for, oral history. Classic radio and television productions like The Radio Ballads (1958-1964), Yesterday’s Witness (1969-1981), and The World at War (1973-1974) pioneered the use of oral history in the media, giving voice to those who would otherwise have been excluded from both the media and the historical record. Since the 1980s, there has been growing use of oral history in TV and radio documentaries and storytelling, with oral histories now forming an important and popular dimension of history and factual programming and broadcasting. However, the methodological, aesthetic, narrative, and ethical decisions behind these productions -- such as who to interview, what questions to ask, and what parts of the interviews end up on the “cutting room floor” -- often remain hidden. The relationship between oral history and the media can also be seen in how oral history has been used to explore the histories and experiences of the media itself, with oral history projects charting the development of media companies and organisation. This has coincided with an upsurge of interest in memory and nostalgia related to the experiences of media, such as memories of cinema, books, and music. Elsewhere, the advent of new media and social media has fuelled the growth of digital storytelling, interactive documentaries, as well as serialised audio podcasts which draw heavily on oral history testimony. Whilst these new technologies, formats, and channels offer new ways of creating, disseminating, and consuming oral history, they also raise vital questions about ethics, participation, expertise, audiences, and formats in oral history practice. This conference aims to consider the relationship between oral history and the media, both historically and today, by exploring similarities, differences, opportunities, and challenges between media practices and oral history practices, from interviewing to editing, audiences to ethics, covering topics such as:  ·       The Use and Misuse of Oral History in the Media ·       Memories of (the) Media: Film, Books, TV, Radio, Theatre, Music·       The Influence of the Media on Memory: Mediated Memory and Prosthetic Memory·       Oral History, Media, and Editing: Soundbites, Vox-Pops, and the "Cutting-Room Floor"·       Oral History, Media, and Interviewing: Intersubjectivity, Questions, and Emotion·       Journalism, Crisis Oral History, and Historical Distance·       Oral Histories of the Media (professions, organisations, and companies)·       New Media, Social Media, and Oral History ·       Changing Media and Formats and its implications for Oral History·       Archiving, Preservation, and Re-use of Oral Histories in the Media PROPOSALSThe deadline for submission of proposals is 20th December 2019. Each proposal should include: a title, an abstract of between 250 and 300 words, your name (and the names of any copresenters, panellists, etc.), your institution or organisation, your email address, and a note of any particular requirements. Most importantly, your abstract should demonstrate the use of oral history or personal testimony and be directly related to the conference theme. Proposals that include audio playback are strongly encouraged. Proposals should be emailed to the ORAL HISTORY AND THE MEDIA conference manager, Polly Owen, at polly.owen@ohs.org.uk. They will be assessed anonymously by the conference organisers, and presenters will be contacted in January/February 2020. www.ohs.org.uk/conferences/conference-2020/

     

  • 2020-07-03 - 2020-07-05 All day

      STOUT RESEARCH CENTRE

                                                 for New Zealand Studies

     CALL FOR PAPERS

    New Zealand Oral History Conference

     Stout Research Centre for New Zealand Studies and the

    National Oral History Association of New Zealand (NOHANZ) Te Kete Kōrero-a-Waha o Te Motu

    Victoria University of Wellington

    3 – 5 July 2020

    Ko wai mātou?        Who are we?

     A common thread runs through the contemporary work of many philosophers, economists, geneticists, historians and novelists world-wide. Who are we? What unites us? What separates us?  As we in Aotearoa New Zealand grapple with the consequences of colonisation 250 years on, questions of personal and collective identity resonate on multiple levels. Do we share any form of collective identity?

    We invite papers that explore “who are we?” in different and interesting ways.

    • There are multiple social and cultural dimensions to identity – iwi/hapu, family, ethnicity, occupation, class, sexuality, generation, and gender among them.
    • How do we navigate the personal and collective multiplicity of identities that are part and parcel of everyday life?
    • In what ways are these identities perceived to overlap?
    • How do we negotiate conflicting identities?
    • Past or present – which matters more when considering who we are?
    • Are our life narratives our self-identities?

    Through the medium of interviews and life narratives oral historians are able to record a rich diversity of perspectives and make a contribution to understanding the question “Ko wai mātou?” or “Who are we?”.

     Keynote speakers include:

    (Waskam) Emelda Davis, founding member and chairwoman of Australian South Sea Islanders (Port Jackson) in Sydney, speaking on ‘Children of the Sugar Slaves’.

     and

     Na Li, Research Fellow and Professor in the Department of History, Zhejiang University, China, speaking on “Oral History, Public Memory, and Political Identity: A Transnational Dialogue”. To be confirmed.

     Workshops:

    There will be workshops on Friday 3 July at the National Library, Wellington.

     To submit a proposal

    Please send a title, 200-word (maximum) abstract, and a brief (two sentence) biography:

    To:  Stout-centre@vuw.ac.nz

    By:  Friday 18 April 2020

    In all cases, to assist with later programme planning, please indicate clearly the focus of your paper within the broad theme. You will be notified by the end of April whether your paper has been accepted.

    Registration for the conference will open on Monday 4 May 2020.

    If you have any questions about the conference, please contact:

     Anna Green:  anna.green@vuw.ac.nz

    or

    Anna Packer: nohanzexec@gmail.com

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