6-10 May: In the Mind’s Eye

IN THE MIND’S EYE: RECORDING ORAL HISTORY | MAY 6-10
TUTOR: JUDITH FYFE | FEE: $450
This workshop is essential for anyone considering using oral history in their work, community or personal projects. It will provide information on the essentials of oral history research, including methodology, project planning, best equipment, interview techniques, legal and ethical issues and processing oral history in order to make the material available for use. There’ll be plenty of hands-on practice!

Great events make history but ultimately, it’s the individual’s perception of events which really matters. The collection of oral testimony based on individual memory enriches the store of historical evidence to reconstruct the past, whether that past is a collective public one or a private, familial one.

All materials, including recorders, will be provided, but if you already have one you intend to use for your project, please bring it.

JUDITH’S BIO
Judith is a lawyer and oral historian. Currently she practises as a barrister specialising in investigation. She lectures in oral history in New Zealand and the United States and is contracted by the Alexander Turnbull Library to carry out contemporary oral history projects. Prior to founding the New Zealand Oral History Archive, she worked in broadcasting, television and film.

Her publications include The Gamble – Campaign Diary of the Challengers (co-writer Hugo Manson); The Matriarchs and War Stories Our Mothers Never Told Us; Oral History: An Introduction to Social Research in New Zealand (Editors: Carl Davidson & Martin Tolich).

Judith’s assistant Lynette Shum is the Oral History Advisor at the Alexander Turnbull Library, focusing on training, advice, and support. Her master’s thesis used oral history to look at the history of the Chinese community in Wellington.

Related upcoming events

  • 2019-08-29 09:00 - 2019-08-29 16:30

    Read the flyer

    The Winter School in Advanced Oral History is designed for members of the public and postgraduate students who are thinking about or starting a research project that includes oral history interviews. The course will benefit those with previous oral history or qualitative interview experience who wish to extend and deepen their knowledge of the field, and those interested in recording, understanding and contextualising family memories.

    You will examine different approaches to oral history including those based upon Mātauranga Māori/Kaupapa Māori and learn the steps required to construct a methodologically robust, ethical oral history research proposal. As you progress, you will discuss how to frame the research goals, find the interview cohort, choose an interview format, and contextualise your material.

    By the end of the course you will have learned about different research methods and formulated a draft oral history research proposal. There will also be the opportunity to discuss possible forms of publication.

    A limited number of Māori, Pasifika and financial hardship scholarships are available – see the application form for details on how to apply.

    Scholarship applications close Monday 15 July
    Notification of decision Monday 29 July

    Course Objectives:

    • Formulate an oral history research proposal

    • Learn about different research methods and modes of analysis

    • Be introduced to Mātauranga Māori/Kaupapa Māori approaches to oral history

    • Consider the relationship between memory and history

    Recommended Reading List:

    • Robert Perks and Alistair Thomson, eds, The Oral History Reader, 2nd ed (Routledge, 2006).

    • Anna Green and Megan Hutching, eds, Remembering: Writing Oral History (Auckland University Press, 2004).

    Course Outline:

    DAY ONE

    1. Introduction: What do we know about memory/remembering?

    2. What is oral history? Approaches and debates

    3. Mātauranga Māori/Kaupapa Māori approaches to oral history

    4. Framing the purpose and goals of your oral history project

    5. Who do I want to interview and how do I find them?

    6. Workshop exercise: drafting part one of proposal

    DAY TWO

    7. The recorded interview and interview questions

    8. Ethics: agreement and consent

    9. Analysis: social and cultural historical context

    10. Analysis: narrative form

    11. The relationship between memory and history

    12. Workshop exercise: finalizing your oral history project proposal

    Facilitators:

    The course will be collaboratively taught by Associate Professor Anna Green, Stout Research Centre; Dr Arini Loader History programme, Victoria University of Wellington; and public historian Megan Hutching.

    A nna Green

    Associate Professor Anna Green is a member of the Stout Research Centre in New Zealand Studies at Victoria University of Wellington. Oral history and the relationship between memory and history have been at the centre of her research and publications, with a focus upon working lives and communities, environmental disaster, and the family. Her current Marsden researc​_h project on Pākehā intergenerational family memory is entitled ‘The Missing Link’.

    Arini Loader

    Dr Arini Loader is a lecturer in the School of History, Philosophy, Political Science and International Relations at Victoria University of Wellington. She specialises in the history of Aotearoa New Zealand. Her current research projects include a collaborative project with Dr Michael Ross on a collection of waiata (song) texts written by Māori taken prisoner following the battle of Rangiriri in the New Zealand Wars.

    Megan Hutching

    Megan Hutching is a freelance historian and oral historian with over 25 years’ experience in these fields. Her recent oral history work includes commissioned oral history projects for the New Zealand Association of Women Judges, and Engineering NZ, as well as a number of life history interviews for families. Personal oral history projects include the Auckland harbour bridge, and the domestic lives of New Zealand women in the mid-twentieth century.

  • 2019-09-16 - 2019-09-18 All day

    University of Stirling,Scotland 16-18 September 2019.

    Confirmed Keynotes:

    Professor Marianne Hirsch (Columbia University)

    Professor Lyndsey Stonebridge (University of Birmingham)

    The last century has seen millions of people displaced around the world as the result of war, persecution, or the end of empire. The current ‘migrant’ or ‘border crisis’ in the Mediterranean triggered by the war in Syria, uneven development in the Global South, and climate change is the most recent example of a succession of instances of forced mass migration. Within this long history of forced migration across continents and within Europe, we can also include the German Vertriebene, the French pieds-noirs, the Portuguese retornados, and forced migrants from the former Yugoslavia. These population movements posed acute political and social challenges to the receiving states, since they often embodied liminal positions being both citizens of receiving nation states and yet members of culturally distinct groups. These challenges often result in trauma for the individuals and families who experience them. In the longer term, migrants and receiving societies face the challenges of cultural integration, in which ethnicity, colonial ties and the associated legal status may, paradoxically, both facilitate acceptance and create barriers to it. The large number of forced migrants involved has implications for nationhood and identity on a supranational scale, leading to the production of new forms of cultural memory and political formulations in the present.

    This conference seeks to bring together and create a dialogue among scholars working on diverse geographical and historical instances of forced migration from a range of disciplinary perspectives in order to illuminate the processes of movement, integration and commemoration which characterise them. The primary focus of the conference will be forced migrations that have highlighted and/or called into question the internal and external borders of Europe, although comparative case studies from beyond Europe are welcome. Above all, it seeks to assess the ‘connectedness’ of disparate cases of forced migrations and to consider the influence and impact of specific events on subsequent migrations and those groups involved in them. It builds on the historical and ethnographical work of scholars such as Andrea L. Smith (Europe’s Invisible Migrants, 2003) and Manuel Borutta and Jan Jansen (Vertriebene and Pieds-Noirs in Postwar Germany and France, 2016), and seeks to broaden their comparative analyses to consider other forced migrant groups, and to extend the scholarship into new disciplinary areas. The conference is interested in how narratives by and about forced migrants use imaginative means to make sense of and represent their experiences, and to construct post-migration identities through genres such as literature, film, music, photography, and documentary.

    The conference committee welcome proposals across disciplines of migration studies, cultural studies, history, politics, literature, visual culture, memory studies, and other relevant scholarly fields. The scope of the conference includes but is not limited to:

    Attitudes towards and reception of migrant groups
    The legalities of forced migration
    Impacts on nationhood and European identity
    Borderscapes and biopolitics
    State management of perceived ‘migrant crises’
    Forced migrants as political constituents and lobbying groups
    Gendered experiences of forced migration
    Queering migration
    Exile and trauma
    Nostalgia and constructions of ‘home’
    Cultural memory: inter-generational transmission, multidirectionality, and ‘connective’ narratives
    Public approaches to fostering integration
    (Re-)constructing community and diaspora
    Attempts at return
    Please send proposals of 300 words and short bios for papers lasting 20 minutes to Dr Beatrice Ivey at beatrice.ivey@stir.ac.uk by 28 February 2019. Proposals for three or four paper panels are also welcomed, as are proposals from postgraduate students and early-career researchers. The language of the conference is English.

    The conference is funded by the AHRC, as part of the Leadership Fellows project, ‘Narratives and representations of the French settlers of Algeria’.

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