2018 OHA Annual Meeting

2018-10-10 - 2018-10-13 All day

Annual Meeting

2018 OHA Annual Meeting
October 10-13, 2018
Concordia University
Montreal, Quebec, Canada

Make plans to attend the 2018 OHA Annual Meeting at Concordia University in Montreal. The annual meeting attracts a broad range of people and features the best work in the field. The meeting enables students and both emerging and established scholars to network and learn valuable skills. The theme for 2018 is Oral History in Our Challenging Times.

The Call is available at 2018 Call for Papers. The submission site is open at OHA 2018. The proposal deadline is January 31, 2018.

Please see Conference Directions for more information about where the conference is located and the best ways to get there. We also have some tips for driving around Quebec and Montreal.

Here are some Travel Trips on how to navigate the traveling process to Canada.

Finally, here are some good places to eat in the area, as well as some fun attractions to check out while in Montreal.

From #believesurvivors to #metoo, narratives around harassment, abuse, and sexual violence have become increasingly prominent in the media over the last few years. This panel draws on feminist oral history practice to explore critical questions relating to oral narratives of harassment and abuse. Oral history, with its ability to capture personal experiences and intimate narratives, is well-suited to document experiences of sexual violence, harassment, and abuse. The sharing of traumatic memories can also raise a range of ethical issues for narrators and interviewers. This panel explores how interviews exploring experiences of harassment and abuse, particularly within institutions and organizations, can shed new light on contemporary efforts to achieve justice for survivors.

This is a proposed panel for OHA 2018. Please send abstracts for papers to kja45@sfu.ca by January 17th. Abstracts must be 300 words or less and accompanied by a 400-word (or less) CV. Applicants will be notified if their paper will be part of the proposed panel by January 21st.

Potential paper topics include:

• Sexual violence within past or present social justice movements

• Sexual abuse or harassment in the workplace

• Intersections between sexual violence and other forms of oppression (such as racism, classism, transphobia, ableism, and homophobia)

• Legal and ethical issues relating to interviews about specific acts of abuse or harassment.

• Trauma-informed approaches to interviewing.

• Shared authority as it relates to interviews with survivors or perpetrators of violence.

• Other ethical issues pertaining to interviewing accused perpetrators of violence and abuse.

• Oral histories of anti-violence activist movements.

This list is not exhaustive, and we welcome all submissions that explore oral histories of gendered abuse, harassment, and violence.

Related upcoming events

  • 2019-01-03 - 2019-01-06 All day

    Chicago
    Panel "Loyalty and Competing Narratives in Oral History

    The panel is tentatively titled "Loyalty and Competing Narratives in Oral History," and deals with the challenge of if and how, and to what extent, the historian should or must privilege their own interpretation over the meanings that interlocutors assign to their own stories.

    This panel addresses one of the most prominent challenges facing historians working with testimony: how to balance the scholar’s interpretation against, or alongside, the meanings and significance with which subjects invest their own life stories. Confronting the tension between loyalties (what the historian feels towards the subject and what she feels towards her own interpretation) is more than a simple theoretical exercise; it can profoundly shape the finished product and has ramifications for the morality and ethics of historical practice when that practice includes living interlocutors. Moreover, does (or should) the loyalty (or conflicted loyalties) that oral historians feel towards their subjects differ from the fidelity (or skepticism) which historians of all stripes should approach their source material? This panel explores these questions and seeks to contribute new theoretical and methodological insight to the evolving field of oral history.

  • 2019-01-11 - 2019-01-14 All day

    For many of us, family is the obvious—and sometimes most complicated—place to start our work as oral historians. In this workshop, participants will learn how to use oral history to document and preserve their family stories. We’ll discuss common challenges: convincing your family to participate, delving into sensitive subjects and secrets, and working with interviewees who may suffer from memory loss. We’ll also discuss the potential for oral history to repair and transform relationships. Optional evening activities include a mini family-themed movie fest and an evening of embarrassing family stories, of course!

    This workshop is a good fit for novices or advanced oral historians embarking on a family history project, broadly defined—or for those exploring the nuances of “insider” interviews. Also welcome: those working on projects about constructed families or constellations of people intimately related. Special topics: ethics, memory loss, individual and collective memory, song collection. All students receive a resource packet, which includes examples of relevant forms and an e-reader.

    Instructor: Suzanne Snider
    Location: Drop Forge & Tool, Hudson, New York
    Tuition: $575 ($500 for friends/family members who apply together)

    Tuition includes an OHSS e-reader, workbook, tote bag and two group meals. A detailed schedule is provided ahead of time for participants.

    * This workshop also serves as basic oral history training for those working on projects without a family focus.

  • 2019-01-19 - 2019-01-21 All day

    This workshop is designed for educators who want to bring oral history into their classrooms and learning spaces. We’ll begin with a rigorous introduction to oral history theory, methods and practice before reviewing existing curricula as a jumping off place to design our own curricula/projects.

    We’ll think about how oral history’s best practices dovetail with a range of learning objectives, seizing upon the field’s potential to support active listening, ethical documentary practice along with considerations of: primary sources, myth, memory, the archive as a future history, silence, talking across difference, problem solving, shared authority, collaborative analysis and historiography. Participants will be guided through a design process with a chance to workshop their emergent ideas with the group.

    Note: The example curricula will be directly relevant for learners age 5 and up, though we welcome early childhood educators, as well. Please contact us with any questions about the appropriate fit of this workshop or other workshops.

    Instructor: Suzanne Snider
    Location: 1 North Front Street, Hudson, New York
    Tuition: Sliding Scale ($475 to $700. See below for more details)*
    We are accepting scholarship applications from local Hudson area educators (K-12) for three tuition-free spaces

  • 2019-02-02 - 2019-02-07 All day

    Saturday, February 2, 2019 9:30 AM
    Thursday, February 7, 2019 3:00 PM

    Project Design is a dynamic phase of oral history practice, giving oral historians a chance to discipline their thinking, address ethical challenges, identify sites for potential collaboration, assess their resources, define “success,” and brainstorm potential future uses beyond the archive.

    Project Design, which we can think of as our projects’ “superego,” stands in contrast to the wild and woolly nature of narrative, itself--presenting with coherence, rules and potential problems. Working on our Project Designs at the front end can be enlivening, inspiring and revelatory when developed in chorus with peers and collaborators, as “problems” become our guides, and part of our projects’ ultimate resolution.

    This workshop will encompass a discussion of outreach methods, budget, training/support, equipment, ethical problems, preservation plan, project focus, motives, sites for collaboration. and nontraditional interview design such as the “oral history chain letter” and the storycircle.

    Participants will have the option of signing up for a 30-minute project consultation.

    We’ll be joined by guest instructors Alex Kelly (New York Public Library) and Liza Zapol (Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution).

    This workshop, which begins with a review oral history theory, methods and practice, is designed for the newcomer and more experienced oral historian, well-suited for those mid-project or those dreaming of a project, ahead. No prior oral history training is assumed.

    Instructors: Suzanne Snider with Alex Kelly and Liza Zapol
    Location: Solaris, Hudson, New York
    Tuition: $725

    Tuition includes an OHSS e-reader, a project consult, workbook, tote bag and two group meals.

  • 2019-03-28 - 2019-03-30 All day

    International conference "Oral History in Action", Poland, Cracow, March 28-30, 2019
    by Marta Kurkowska-Budzan

    Call for Papers

    Polish Oral History Association (PTHM), established in 2009 in Krakow, brings together people and the circles that use oral history in their work in various areas of academic, cultural or social life. On the occasion of the 10th anniversary of the POHA, together with the Institute of History of the Jagiellonian University in Krakow and the Wrocław “Remembrance and Future” Centre, we would like to invite you to take part in the international conference Oral History in Action, that will take place in Krakow on 28-30 March 2019.

    The history of oral history started from practise of first recorded interviews. Therefore, oral history, like no other branch of the humanities, is intrinsically linked to social, civic or interpersonal engagement of an oral historian and oral history itself. Because of that we would like to pose a question whether oral history do (or should do) change social reality: for good or for bad, intentionally or accidentally? Reflection about that engagement, its characteristics, problems and consequences, especially in countries of Central and Eastern Europe, is located in the centre of the conference’s topic. Profiting from the transdisciplinary character of oral history, we hope that our meeting in Krakow will create a space for confrontation and discussion about different approaches to oral history presented by the academia, museums and other cultural institutions, or by NGOs. We are convinced that this multitude character of oral history in historiography, sociology, anthropology, psychology etc., as well as in our contemporary (digital) culture and public life, is both the biggest chance and main challenge for oral historians and their discipline.

    We are seeking for papers reflecting oral history as an activity and considering its consequences, touching at least one of the following topics:

    · oral history in contemporary social sciences and humanities: innovative projects and approaches, interdisciplinary and transdisciplinary character as an epistemological challenge;

    · practical and conceptual challenges of doing oral history in minority groups (e.g. discriminated, advanced aged etc.)

    · oral history as a public history: local, national and international level;

    · oral history and politics, or political dimension of practising and promoting oral history;

    · oral history as a tool of intentional social change vs. researcher’s neutrality: epistemological and ethical dilemmas;

    · oral history as a formof social and communal activity;

    · oral history as a form of therapy;

    · place of oral history in theory and practise of contemporary museums and NGOs;

    · interviewees in the education projects: aims, forms and limits of engagement;

    · new media and oral history: usage and abusage of memories in the Internet;

    · legal problems of doing oral history

    To apply with a paper please send an abstract in English (approx. 300 words) along with your presentation title and your short bio to: oralhistoryinaction@pthm.pl

    Deadline for submissions: 30 November 2018

    The list of the chosen participants will be announced on 20 December 2018.

    There is no fee for taking part in the conference. Chosen texts will be published in peer-reviewed journal “Wrocław Yearbook of Oral History”(https://wrhm.pl/wrhm/about).

    Organisers:
    Polish Oral History Association
    Institute of History, Jagiellonian University in Krakow
    The “Remembrance and Future” Centre in Wrocław
    Partners:
    Fundacja “Dobra Wola”

    The honorary committee:
    Zbigniew Gluza (The Karta Center in Warsaw)
    Professor Kaja Kaźmierska (Institute of Sociology, University of Łódź)
    Dr hab. Grażyna Kubica-Heller (Institute of Sociology, Jagiellonian University in Krakow)
    Dr Wojciech Kucharski (The “Remembrance and Future” Centre in Wroclaw)
    Tomasz Pietrasiewicz (The “Grodzka Gate ‐ NN Theatre” Centre in Lublin)

    Organising committee members:
    Katarzyna Bock-Matuszyk, Alina Doboszewska, Jakub Gałęziowski, Marcin Jarząbek, Dobrochna Kałwa, Wiktoria Kudela-Świątek, Agata Stolarz, Karolina Żłobecka

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