2-7 February 2019 WORKSHOP: Oral History and Project Design

Saturday, February 2, 2019 9:30 AM
Thursday, February 7, 2019 3:00 PM

Project Design is a dynamic phase of oral history practice, giving oral historians a chance to discipline their thinking, address ethical challenges, identify sites for potential collaboration, assess their resources, define “success,” and brainstorm potential future uses beyond the archive.

Project Design, which we can think of as our projects’ “superego,” stands in contrast to the wild and woolly nature of narrative, itself–presenting with coherence, rules and potential problems. Working on our Project Designs at the front end can be enlivening, inspiring and revelatory when developed in chorus with peers and collaborators, as “problems” become our guides, and part of our projects’ ultimate resolution.

This workshop will encompass a discussion of outreach methods, budget, training/support, equipment, ethical problems, preservation plan, project focus, motives, sites for collaboration. and nontraditional interview design such as the “oral history chain letter” and the storycircle.

Participants will have the option of signing up for a 30-minute project consultation.

We’ll be joined by guest instructors Alex Kelly (New York Public Library) and Liza Zapol (Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution).

This workshop, which begins with a review oral history theory, methods and practice, is designed for the newcomer and more experienced oral historian, well-suited for those mid-project or those dreaming of a project, ahead. No prior oral history training is assumed.

Instructors: Suzanne Snider with Alex Kelly and Liza Zapol
Location: Solaris, Hudson, New York
Tuition: $725

Tuition includes an OHSS e-reader, a project consult, workbook, tote bag and two group meals.

Related upcoming events

  • 2019-04-26 - 2019-04-27 All day

    Texas Oral History Association

    Call for Papers

    Eighth Annual Conference, April 26-27, 2019
    St. Edward’s University | Austin, Texas

    The Texas Oral History Association (TOHA), founded in 1983, promotes the use and good practices of oral history research through a variety of programs and publications, including the journal Sound Historian. Comprised of individuals representing diverse interests and disciplines, the professional organization will host its seventh annual conference on April 26-27th, 2019, on the campus of St. Edward’s University in Austin, Texas.

    St. Edward’s University is a private, liberal arts institution that has been in existence since 1885. This meeting is generously sponsored by their Journalism & Digital Media program and the Department of History.

    Scholars, educators, students, history enthusiasts, folklorists, family historians, and others are encouraged to submit proposals for papers or sessions to be considered for the program. Topics should include clear evidence of oral history research or provide new insights on the methodology.

    Both complete session and individual paper proposals are welcome. Individual presentations must not exceed twenty minutes, and the session format will include opening remarks by a chair, followed by three papers, or by two papers and concluding remarks from a commentator. Proposals should include the names, affiliations, and contact information of participants, the titles of sessions and papers, and a brief description of the topics to be covered. Please submit your proposals via email by January 31st, 2019.

    Direct all submittals and inquiries to our offices at toha@baylor.edu . Thank you and we look forward to your submissions!

  • 2019-05-06 - 2019-05-10 All day

    IN THE MIND’S EYE: RECORDING ORAL HISTORY | MAY 6-10
    TUTOR: JUDITH FYFE | FEE: $450
    This workshop is essential for anyone considering using oral history in their work, community or personal projects. It will provide information on the essentials of oral history research, including methodology, project planning, best equipment, interview techniques, legal and ethical issues and processing oral history in order to make the material available for use. There’ll be plenty of hands-on practice!

    Great events make history but ultimately, it’s the individual’s perception of events which really matters. The collection of oral testimony based on individual memory enriches the store of historical evidence to reconstruct the past, whether that past is a collective public one or a private, familial one.

    All materials, including recorders, will be provided, but if you already have one you intend to use for your project, please bring it.

    JUDITH’S BIO
    Judith is a lawyer and oral historian. Currently she practises as a barrister specialising in investigation. She lectures in oral history in New Zealand and the United States and is contracted by the Alexander Turnbull Library to carry out contemporary oral history projects. Prior to founding the New Zealand Oral History Archive, she worked in broadcasting, television and film.

    Her publications include The Gamble – Campaign Diary of the Challengers (co-writer Hugo Manson); The Matriarchs and War Stories Our Mothers Never Told Us; Oral History: An Introduction to Social Research in New Zealand (Editors: Carl Davidson & Martin Tolich).

    Judith’s assistant Lynette Shum is the Oral History Advisor at the Alexander Turnbull Library, focusing on training, advice, and support. Her master’s thesis used oral history to look at the history of the Chinese community in Wellington.

  • 2019-06-01 - 2019-06-02 All day

    Extended deadline to 11 February 2019, KOHA 2019 -- Call for Papers by Christian J. Park

    KOHA Tenth Anniversary Conference -- June 1, 2019
    Chung-Ang University in Seoul, South Korea

    Keynote speaker: Prof. Alessandro Portelli (University of Rome La Sapienza)

    The Korean Oral History Association (KOHA) is celebrating its tenth anniversary in 2019. KOHA was founded in 2009 to promote more systemic oral history research based on 20 years of oral history practices and research in South Korea. This means moving forward from collecting oral histories to establishing oral history research as a formidable historiography and new ways of writing and doing history. Since its foundation, KOHA has worked to promote and educate good practices of oral history collection including systemic archives. As an interdisciplinary association of humanities and social sciences including anthropology, history, sociology, folk studies, Korean literature, and political science, KOHA also seeks to build a network of diverse oral history scholars, archives, institutions, and organizations.

    To celebrate the ten-year anniversary, the 2019 conference with the theme “Beyond ‘Oral History’ and Back to Oral Histories” will not only look back at the last decade of Korean oral history but also look forward to its future. In addition, it will have a limited number of international sessions (a total of 3 sessions or min. 7 presenters). International scholars, researchers, educators, and others are encouraged to submit proposals for papers or sessions to be considered for the program. Topics should include clear evidence of oral history research or provide new insights into the methodology with a regional focus preferably on South Korea or Asia but are not limited to a particular region.

    Both complete session and individual paper proposals are welcome. Individual presentations must not exceed twenty minutes. The morning-session (2 hours) format includes a minimum of three presentations and remarks by 2-3 discussants, while the two afternoon sessions (1.5 hours) have a format of a minimum of two presenters and 1-2 discussants. If there is no discussant assigned, the organizing committee may assign a discussant.

    Proposals should include the names, affiliations, and contact information of participants, the titles of sessions and papers, and a brief description of the topics to be covered (250 words).

    Please submit your proposals via email by February 11, 2019

    The conference will be held on June 1 (Saturday) in Seoul, South Korea, followed on June 2 by a tour of the DMZ area and Seoul historic sites. Venue details of the conference are to be determined.

    Direct all submittals and inquiries to the organising committee at koha2019.conference@gmail.com.
    If you have any questions, please contact Christian Park at cpark613@outlook.com.

    Thank you and we look forward to your submission!

  • 2019-06-28 - 2019-06-29 All day

    CFP: Oral History Network of Ireland's Annual Conference "Oral History in a Digital World" -- Limerick City, 28 & 29 June 2019

    by Arlene Crampsie

    The Oral History Network of Ireland (OHNI) is pleased to announce its 2019 conference on the theme of "Oral History in a Digital World." Collecting oral history in digital formats and putting recordings online is increasingly becoming standard practice for oral historians. As such, this conference offers a timely opportunity to consider the possibilities and challenges offered by technological advances and wider accessibility to collections through online platforms. This two-day conference will take place at Mary Immaculate College, Limerick, on Friday, June 28, and Saturday, June 29, 2019.

     

    Continuing OHNI’s tradition of inviting keynote speakers of international renown, we are delighted to welcome to this year’s conference Doug Boyd, Director of the Louie B. Nunn Center for Oral History at University of Kentucky, past president of the Oral History Association, and manager of Oral History in the Digital Age. Doug is a key innovator in the archiving and dissemination of oral history and leads the team that developed the free, open-source OHMS system which synchronises text with audio and video online. He is the co-editor (with Mary A. Larson) of the book Oral History and Digital Humanities: Voice, Access, and Engagement, published by Palgrave MacMillan in 2014.

     

    Conference contributions are welcome in a range of formats:

    • Standard conference papers (20 minutes)
    • 10-minute presentations for our "Moments" panels, focusing on outstanding or memorable individuals, experiences, and/or incidents that influenced or changed the way the presenter practices oral history
    • Posters and visual presentations

    While we welcome proposals on any topic related to oral history, we are particularly interested in proposals that take an imaginative approach to the "Oral History in a Digital World" conference theme. Potential topics could include (but are not limited to):

    • Collecting, archiving, and disseminating digital oral histories
    • Technological possibilities and challenges
    • Methods and techniques
    • From tapes and CDs to digital formats
    • Increasing access and engagement with digital tools
    • Digital oral history in the classroom
    • Social media and oral history
    • Ethical and legal issues of online oral histories
    • Re-using online oral history collections
    • Innovative online projects

    To propose a paper, please submit an abstract (of no more than 250 words) along with your name; the name of your group, organisation, or institution; and your email address to info@oralhistorynetworkireland.ie before 5 p.m. Friday, February 22, 2019. All proposals must demonstrate a clear engagement with oral history and/or personal testimony, and we actively encourage the use of audio clips. The conference committee’s decision on successful abstracts will be communicated to potential presenters in March.

     

    Registration for the conference and further information will shortly be posted on the conference page of our website. For further details or queries, please contact us through info@oralhistorynetworkireland.ie.

  • 2019-09-16 - 2019-09-18 All day

    University of Stirling,Scotland 16-18 September 2019.

    Confirmed Keynotes:

    Professor Marianne Hirsch (Columbia University)

    Professor Lyndsey Stonebridge (University of Birmingham)

    The last century has seen millions of people displaced around the world as the result of war, persecution, or the end of empire. The current ‘migrant’ or ‘border crisis’ in the Mediterranean triggered by the war in Syria, uneven development in the Global South, and climate change is the most recent example of a succession of instances of forced mass migration. Within this long history of forced migration across continents and within Europe, we can also include the German Vertriebene, the French pieds-noirs, the Portuguese retornados, and forced migrants from the former Yugoslavia. These population movements posed acute political and social challenges to the receiving states, since they often embodied liminal positions being both citizens of receiving nation states and yet members of culturally distinct groups. These challenges often result in trauma for the individuals and families who experience them. In the longer term, migrants and receiving societies face the challenges of cultural integration, in which ethnicity, colonial ties and the associated legal status may, paradoxically, both facilitate acceptance and create barriers to it. The large number of forced migrants involved has implications for nationhood and identity on a supranational scale, leading to the production of new forms of cultural memory and political formulations in the present.

    This conference seeks to bring together and create a dialogue among scholars working on diverse geographical and historical instances of forced migration from a range of disciplinary perspectives in order to illuminate the processes of movement, integration and commemoration which characterise them. The primary focus of the conference will be forced migrations that have highlighted and/or called into question the internal and external borders of Europe, although comparative case studies from beyond Europe are welcome. Above all, it seeks to assess the ‘connectedness’ of disparate cases of forced migrations and to consider the influence and impact of specific events on subsequent migrations and those groups involved in them. It builds on the historical and ethnographical work of scholars such as Andrea L. Smith (Europe’s Invisible Migrants, 2003) and Manuel Borutta and Jan Jansen (Vertriebene and Pieds-Noirs in Postwar Germany and France, 2016), and seeks to broaden their comparative analyses to consider other forced migrant groups, and to extend the scholarship into new disciplinary areas. The conference is interested in how narratives by and about forced migrants use imaginative means to make sense of and represent their experiences, and to construct post-migration identities through genres such as literature, film, music, photography, and documentary.

    The conference committee welcome proposals across disciplines of migration studies, cultural studies, history, politics, literature, visual culture, memory studies, and other relevant scholarly fields. The scope of the conference includes but is not limited to:

    Attitudes towards and reception of migrant groups
    The legalities of forced migration
    Impacts on nationhood and European identity
    Borderscapes and biopolitics
    State management of perceived ‘migrant crises’
    Forced migrants as political constituents and lobbying groups
    Gendered experiences of forced migration
    Queering migration
    Exile and trauma
    Nostalgia and constructions of ‘home’
    Cultural memory: inter-generational transmission, multidirectionality, and ‘connective’ narratives
    Public approaches to fostering integration
    (Re-)constructing community and diaspora
    Attempts at return
    Please send proposals of 300 words and short bios for papers lasting 20 minutes to Dr Beatrice Ivey at beatrice.ivey@stir.ac.uk by 28 February 2019. Proposals for three or four paper panels are also welcomed, as are proposals from postgraduate students and early-career researchers. The language of the conference is English.

    The conference is funded by the AHRC, as part of the Leadership Fellows project, ‘Narratives and representations of the French settlers of Algeria’.

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